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How To Reheat Boiled Potatoes – I Test 4 Methods [Pics]

If you find yourself boiling more potatoes than you need, you may be wondering if you can save them for later.

I’ve experimented with several different reheating techniques to find out what’s best at delivering that freshly boiled texture (without them drying out OR going mushy).

I also include some tips for storing and freezing your boiled potatoes to keep them as fresh as possible, for as long as possible.

Ready? Let’s jump right in.

A note on my experiment

I used small to medium-sized white potatoes for this experiment, but your results may vary slightly from mine, with over 200 varieties of potatoes broken down into seven major categories.

For this experiment, I tried four different methods to reheat my boiled potatoes:

  • In the oven (best for drying out moisture)
  • In the microwave (most convenient)
  • By steaming (great for that ‘just boiled’ taste and texture)
  • Using an air fryer (faster than the oven)

If you’re in a hurry, then the microwave is your best bet.

My potatoes turned out great for the most part, but be careful if your potatoes are moist, as they may come out a bit soggy.

If they are too mushy, then the oven is your best option.

My oven produced beautifully fluffy, buttery results, but it did take a while longer than the microwave.

If you’re pushed for time, pop your potatoes in the microwave first and then transfer them to the oven for a perfect finish.

In each method, the trick is to ensure even heating throughout, by slicing all the potatoes into similar-sized pieces.

Cut larger potatoes into halves or quarters. The small white potatoes I used were a perfect size and didn’t require cutting.

For the best flavor and texture, and to retain their healthy vitamins and minerals, leave the skin on your potatoes when first boiling them. 

They only require a stiff brush and water to remove any dirt.

Reheating boiled potatoes in the oven

I tested with foil and without. Spoiler alert: it didn’t help.

To reheat boiled potatoes, preheat oven to 300°F. Place quartered or halved potatoes on a tray. Lightly grease potatoes with butter. Place tray in the oven for 12-15 minutes depending on size of potatoes. Stick a fork into largest potato to check if done. If the metal is warm the potatoes are ready.

How to reheat boiled potatoes in the oven:

  1. Preheat your oven to 300°F (150°C).
  2. Cut large potatoes into quarters or halves to reduce reheating time.
  3. Lightly grease the potatoes with butter.
  4. Place potatoes on a baking tray and place in the oven.
  5. Bake for 12-15 minutes, depending on the size of the potatoes.
  6. Stick a fork into the largest potato to test the temperature.
  7. Remove the fork and touch the prongs.
  8. The potatoes are ready when the metal is warm to the touch.

Basting the potatoes with butter adds a delicious flavor and helps to keep the potatoes moist.

I also tested whether covering the potatoes in aluminum foil would make a difference to the taste and texture.

It didn’t, and just extended the time it took to heat through.

Of all the methods I tried, this one took the longest but the results were great.

I found that you can increase the temperature of your oven up to 350°F (180°C) to heat other elements of your meal without any negative effects on your potatoes.

Just be sure to check the internal temperature of your potatoes a little earlier to avoid burning them at higher temperatures.

My verdict

This is my preferred method to reheat boiled potatoes if I’m not rushed for time.

Although it does take longer than steaming or microwaving, the results are buttery and delicious.

It’s a convenient way to heat up your entire meal and avoid the possibility of overcooking potatoes that may go a little soggy in the microwave or steamer.

Reheating boiled potatoes in the microwave

Place your potatoes on a microwave-safe dish. To reduce heating time, cut the larger potatoes into halves or quarters. Cover the potatoes with a damp paper towel and place them inside the microwave oven. Set the power to reheat or medium level. Microwave in 30-second intervals until heated through.  

How to reheat boiled potatoes in the microwave:

  1. Place your potatoes on a microwave-safe dish.
  2. Cut larger potatoes into halves or quarters to reduce heating time.
  3. Cover the potatoes with a damp paper towel.
  4. Place the dish of potatoes in the microwave oven.
  5. Set the power to either the reheat or the medium setting.
  6. Microwave in 30-second intervals, testing the potato’s temperature, and repeat until done.

Microwaving is my favorite option when I’m in a hurry, as it’s so convenient.

It’s quick and easy, and I get great results every time. 

You really couldn’t tell that the potatoes had been reheated as they were moist and fluffy.

The only downside with microwaving your boiled potatoes is that it can lead to somewhat unpredictable results unless you are careful.

If your potatoes are a little bit mushy before you reheat them, then it’s a better option to use your conventional oven.

Microwaving will only make overcooked or soggy potatoes worse.

My verdict

This is my favorite method because it achieves that perfect balance between great tasting results and preparation time. 

I got great results with the other methods, but this one wins on the convenience scorecard.

So long as your potatoes are not too moist or mushy to start with, you’re going to get excellent results every time.

Reheating boiled potatoes by steaming

Set up your steamer and bring the water to a simmer. A colander or sieve on top of a pan filled with ½ a cup of water works too. Cut large potatoes into halves or quarters to reduce steaming time and spread them out in the steamer. Steam for 2-4 minutes, depending on the size of the potatoes.  

How to reheat boiled potatoes by steaming:

  1. Set up your steamer with a few inches of water on the bottom.
  2. Insert as many tiers as you require for the number of potatoes you wish to reheat.
  3. Alternatively, place a colander or sieve on top of a pan with ½ cup of water on the bottom.
  4. Set on high heat and, while waiting for the water to start simmering, prepare your potatoes.
  5. Cut large potatoes into halves or quarters to reduce the time required to heat.
  6. Spread out the potatoes in your steamer and close the lid.
  7. Leave the potatoes to steam for 2-4 minutes. (Larger potatoes will take a bit longer)
  8. Test the potato’s temperature and steam until done.

If you don’t have a metal or bamboo steamer, then a pan with a tight-fitting lid and a colander or sieve will work just as well.

Keep in mind that mushy potatoes are going to retain additional water while they steam.

If you’re worried about overcooked potatoes, use your oven to help remove excess moisture for better results.

My verdict

Steaming is another quick method that produces potatoes that you can’t tell have been reheated.

A lidded pan and a few tablespoons of water are available to just about everyone, so this makes it the most accessible way to reheat boiled potatoes.

You have more control over the process, reducing the chances of ruining your potatoes by overcooking them.

Reheating boiled potatoes in the air fryer

Preheat your air fryer to 300°F (150°C). Cutting larger potatoes into halves or quarters to speed up the reheating. Lightly grease the potatoes with butter and spread them out in the basket. Place the basket in the air fryer to heat for approximately 5-7 minutes. Larger potatoes take a little longer.

How to reheat boiled potatoes in the air fryer:

  1. Preheat your air fryer to 300°F (150°C).
  2. Cut larger potatoes into halves or quarters to speed up the heating.
  3. Lightly coat the potatoes with butter.
  4. Spread the potatoes out in the basket to ensure an even airflow.
  5. Place the basket in the air fryer and heat for 5-7 minutes. (Larger potatoes may take a little longer)
  6. Test the potato’s temperature and air fry until done.

Air frying imparts a slightly different taste compared to the other methods of heating, but it is certainly not unpleasant.

My verdict

As the heated air melts the butter, the surface of the potatoes take on a somewhat fried texture and flavor, which is quite unexpected. I was delighted with the effect and enjoyed it thoroughly as it tasted so good.

The flavor and texture are not to everyone’s taste, though.

If you want a traditional boiled potato flavor and texture, stick to steaming or microwaving.

What can you do with leftover boiled potatoes?

If you’re stuck for ideas on what to do with your left-over boiled potato, then try some of these:

  • Baked potatoes – oven-baked potatoes are easy and quick to prepare. Pop the boiled potatoes onto a baking sheet, drizzle some butter or olive oil over them and bake for 10-15 minutes.

  • Potato salad – dice your potatoes into small cubes and mix in a bowl with a lashing of mayonnaise and chopped parsley. If you’re adventurous, dice some red onion and sprinkle smoked paprika for a slightly exotic side dish.

  • Potato soup – grab some diced bacon, diced onion, and crushed garlic. Sauté them all until soft, stir in a tablespoon of flour, 2 cups of stock, 2 cups of milk, and some of your left-over potatoes. Stir in a handful of cheddar cheese, a 1/2 cup of Greek yogurt, salt, and pepper to taste and serve up warm.

  • Mashed potato – mash your leftover boiled potatoes in a pot and add ¼ cup of butter and a 1/3 cup of milk or cream. Mix thoroughly until smooth and fluffy, adding salt and pepper to taste. Heat over a medium flame, stirring constantly, and serve hot.

How to store boiled potatoes

Allow boiled potatoes to reach room temperature but avoid leaving out for more than 2 hours. Transfer cooled boiled potatoes to airtight containers or bags to prevent contamination and place in the refrigerator for no more than 3-5 days. For longer storage, frozen boiled potatoes last up to 12 months.

Remember that the starches and sugars break down the longer you store your boiled potatoes. Freezing does slow down the process, but you can expect the potatoes to become unpalatable the closer they get to their use-by date.

Can you freeze boiled potatoes?

Yes, you can freeze boiled potatoes. Cooked potatoes last between 10 and 12 months when frozen. Don’t freeze raw potatoes as crystalized water inside makes the thawed potato mushy and granular. Waxy varieties that are lower in starch freeze better than potatoes that have higher starch content.

How to freeze boiled potatoes:

  1. Place boiled potatoes in a colander to drain and cool.
  2. Transfer the fully drained, cooled potatoes to a kitchen towel.
  3. Using a paper towel, pat them dry to ensure there is no excess moisture on the potatoes.
  4. Place the potatoes in one layer on a tray without them touching each other.
  5. Place the tray in the freezer to freeze solid. (6-12 hours)
  6. Remove the tray of frozen potatoes and pack in freezer bags or in an airtight container. (Making sure that all the air is removed)
  7. Label the freezer bag with the date of freezing and return it to the freezer.

How to thaw boiled potatoes

You can reheat cubed frozen potatoes without thawing. Larger, whole potatoes should be moved from the freezer to the fridge overnight to allow them to thaw out.

Thaw your boiled potatoes by using your microwave, steamer, oven, or air fryer.

If you plan to add your boiled potatoes to a dish, then delay adding them until the dish is almost finished cooking.

This way, you will avoid overcooking the potatoes, which will result in an unpleasant, mushy consistency.

How to reheat frozen boiled potatoes

Reheating frozen boiled potatoes takes longer than reheating thawed potatoes. Cubed, frozen potatoes don’t require thawing before reheating. Larger, whole potatoes should be thawed overnight in a fridge. Avoid over-cooking frozen potato by adding it to a dish shortly before it’s finished cooking.

How long do boiled potatoes last?

If you’re worried about how long boiled potatoes last, then check out some helpful guidelines below:

  • Room Temperature: Boiled potatoes last up to 2 hours at room temperature, after which time you run the risk of bacteria growth, especially if they are paired with mayonnaise.
  • Refrigerated: You can refrigerate your boiled potatoes for between 3-5 days in an airtight container. Wait for your boiled potatoes to cool down (no more than 2 hours) and place them in an airtight container or bag before refrigerating.
  • Frozen: You can store your frozen boiled potatoes for up to 10 months but aim for six as the sugars and starches break down over time, resulting in a mushy texture when reheated.

Just remember, if in doubt, discard boiled potatoes that have been left out at room temperature for more than a few hours.

To avoid confusion, always mark your freezer bags or containers with the date you froze your boiled potatoes.

The Best Way To Reheat Boiled Potatoes

In this short recipe, I show you the best way to reheat your boiled potatoes to keep them as fresh and fluffy as day one.
No ratings yet
Prep Time 0 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 15 mins
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 1 person
Calories 87 kcal

Ingredients
 

  • 1 portion boiled potatoes

Instructions
 

  • Preheat your oven to 300°F (150°C).
  • Cut large potatoes into quarters or halves to reduce reheating time.
  • Lightly grease the potatoes with butter.
  • Place potatoes on a baking tray and place in the oven.
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes, depending on the size of the potatoes.
  • Stick a fork into the largest potato to test the temperature.
  • Remove the fork and touch the prongs.
  • The potatoes are ready when the metal is warm to the touch.

Notes

Basting the potatoes with butter adds a delicious flavor and helps to keep the potatoes moist.
I also tested whether covering the potatoes in aluminum foil would make a difference to the taste and texture.
It didn’t, and just extended the time it took to heat through.
Of all the methods I tried, this one took the longest but the results were great. I found that you can increase the temperature of your oven up to 350°F (175°C) to heat other elements of your meal without any negative effects on your potatoes.
Just be sure to check the internal temperature of your potatoes a little earlier to avoid burning them at higher temperatures.

Nutrition

Serving: 100gCalories: 87kcal
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

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